Entries tagged with “What in the World? Numbers in Nature


Signing at Cooks and Books on Hilton Head Island

Signing at Cooks and Books on Hilton Head Island

The Book Loft, Sunday, November 26, 2017 – Signing 1-4 p.m. at 214 Centre Street, Fernandina Beach, FL

Holiday Market, Saturday, December 2, 2017 – Signing 9-4 at Lord of Life Lutheran Church, 2801 Frederica, St. Simons Island, GA.

Amelia Island Book Festival, Saturday, February 17, 2018 – Signing 10 – 6 Saturday at Fernandina Beach Middle School, 315 Citrona Drive, Fernandina Beach, FL.

Hope you’ll make one of these fun events and say hello!

 

Fun in the sun

Fun in the sun

Had a blast being a featured author at this year’s Savannah Children’s Book Festival on Saturday, November 14 in beautiful Forsyth Park. Reading and signing What in the World?, Way Down Below Deep, A is for Alliguitar, and On a Windy Night, I met lots of engaged and excited young readers. Watching fellow children’s authors Brian Lies (Bats at the Beach), Kate DiCamillo (Because of Winn Dixie), Kevin Sherry (I’m the Biggest Thing in the Ocean) and others work their magic was illuminating as well. In the afternoon, I signed books next to Christopher Smith, an up-and-coming author, age 6.

What in the World cover

Want to win a signed copy of What in the World? Numbers in Nature? Enter my giveaway on Goodreads before October 1

 

 

Today, September 1, a book is born. Welcome into the world of What in the World? Numbers in Nature.

octopus eight

The celebration started last week, when the New York Times Book Review included this title in a back-to-school roundup of picture books dealing with numbers.

The celebration continues with local signings–First Friday at the Brunswick Public Library, 6-8 p.m. on September 4 and at G.J. Ford Bookshop on St. Simons Island, 1-3 p.m. on Saturday, September 12.

Want to join the celebration? On the Simon & Schuster What in the World? page, you can order a copy from the publisher or your favorite online bookseller. You can also become a “fan”–and get your choice of other e-books published by S&S–free.  And check out my guest post for writers on “Fiction University“–new today.

Cheers!

what-in-the-world-9781481400602.in05So happy that Kirkus Reviews–known for its pickiness–gave What in the World? Numbers in Nature a thumbs up! Here’s what the reviewer said:

This more-than-a-counting-book introduces things recognizable in numbered sets.

The compact, rhyming narrative rhetorically asks readers to think about numbers in the world, beginning and ending with eyes on the sky: “What in the world comes one by one? / A nose. A mouth. The moon. / The sun.” Young listeners who comprehend the world through the ways it can be measured will find this gripping and consoling….The counting goes up through 10, looking at birds, insects, sea creatures, and deer in the seaside forest. “Three” invites discussion about the parts of bees—their bodies comprise head, thorax, and abdomen, but they also have wings and antennae. The word—sets—that has been implied all along appears near the end: “And what comes in sets too big to count?” Here…a starry sky bears the faint outlines of each numbered thing that has come before….Textured, visually rich, and gracefully simple, this is a fine blend of informative poetry and illustration.

And School Library Journal had good things to say as well: Day’s simple rhyming text encourages children to count natural phenomena. From one moon and sun to stars in “sets too big to count,” her examples give viewers opportunities to hone their skills. The large format encourages group participation. For the most part, the items to be counted are easily identified. Five arms on five sea stars and eight undulating octopus limbs are exceptionally clear….Cyrus’s thoughtfully composed illustrations will reward repeated viewings, because featured objects recur in several places. For example, the three bees hovering in the lower corner of the spread featuring two bluebirds appear prominently when the page is turned. Sharp-eyed viewers will be rewarded by such discoveries, including the appearance of many plants and animals traced in the night sky among the stars. —Kathy Piehl, Minnesota State University Library